SSAE Report Frequently Asked Questions

SSAE 16 and SSAE 18 Audits bring tons of questions. In this section we hope to answer some questions we frequently come across during our calls and client interactions.

SOC 1

How many updates to SOC 1 have their been?

SOC 1 stemmed from the original SAS 70 report, which, once SSAE 16 was issued in April 2010, the formal report name was changed to being a SOC 1 report (but issued under the SSAE 16 guidance) and effective as of June 2011. SSAE 18 was then issued May 2017 and will be effective as of December 2018, and apply to all SOC 1 reports issued thereafter.

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How long does a SOC 1 take to complete?

This depends on how prepared and how many resources an Organization has to dedicate to the project. The first time through, usually a readiness assessment would be performed, and then a SOC 1 Type 1, and take anywhere from 2 to 3 months. However, there are situations where it may take 6 to 12 months should an Organization not have the resources or sufficient priority assigned.

A Type 2 report takes about 2 months to complete, but, it may take a little longer during the first audit and become more efficient every year thereafter.

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SOC 1 or HITRUST?

The SOC 1 has a completely different purpose than HITRUST. Typically a company would perform both if they are a TPA processing medical claims and other claims, where, there is responsibility for financial reporting and maintaining security over the information being handled.

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How much does a SOC 1 Type 1 cost?

A SOC 1 Type 1 report typically costs on average anywhere between $10,000 and $20,000 USD, without the readiness assessment project which most Organizations benefit from and can be an additional $5,000 to $10,000 USD depending on the level of assistance required and project scope.

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Are Third Party Vendor reviews required for SOC 1 and SOC 2?

As of the latest SSAE 18 and SOC 2 updates, vendor management and review of any relevant compliance / audit reports (SOC 1, SOC 2, HITRUST, ISO 27001/2, PCI, etc.) has become a key component of monitoring for potential security and compliance risks when outsourcing functions that use a third party’s data.

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