Tag Archives: soc 1

SSAE 16 Terminology – Criteria

Criteria, as defined by the SSAE 18 (formerly SSAE 16) guidance are:

The standards or benchmarks used to measure and present the subject matter and against which the service auditor evaluates the subject matter.

Criteria are the overarching goals that the control objectives and activities that are in place are designed to meet and that the final report is to give assurance on, for example, “The system is protected against unauthorized access (both physical and logical).” To meet this criteria, a company may decide to include controls such as “Firewalls are installed at all external entry points” or “A User Access Review of Access Badges is performed on a Monthly Basis”. Criteria are used as a benchmark to assess the design and operating effectiveness of internal controls at an organization, however, Management is responsible for making sure that the controls in place support the defined criteria sufficiently.

There are best practice criteria available for most industries that reflect prevailing internal controls best practices and requirements from around the world, some of these can be found on the AICPA website if you would like some additional examples.

This definition and information is consistent in SSAE-18.

SOC 1 Report

A SOC 1 Report (System and Organization Controls Report) is a report on Controls at a Service Organization which are relevant to user entities’ internal control over financial reporting. The SOC1 Report is what you would have previously considered to be the standard SAS70, complete with a Type I and Type II reports, but falls under the SSAE 16 guidance (and soon to be SSAE 18).

Please see the following articles discussing the SSAE 16 guidance and additional information related to the SOC 1 (Type I and Type II) Reports:

In addition to the SOC 1 report which is restricted to controls relevant to an audit of a user entity’s financial statements, the SOC 2 and SOC 3 reports have been created to address controls relevant to operations and compliance and will be discussed in further detail in the future.

Please see the SOC 1 Reporting Guide page for additional information.

SOC 1 Report

A SOC 1 Report (System and Organization Controls Report) is a report on Controls at a Service Organization which are relevant to user entities’ internal control over financial reporting. The SOC1 Report is what you would have previously considered to be the standard SAS70 (or SSAE 16), complete with a Type I and Type II reports, but falls under the SSAE 18 guidance (as of May 1, 2017).
Please see the following articles discussing the SSAE 18 guidance and additional information related to the SOC 1 (Type I and Type II) Reports:

Below is a history of key changes made to the audit standard over time to enhance the overall audit and final report.

Differences between SAS 70, SSAE 16 and ISAE 3042:

  1. Management of the Service Organization will be required to provide the service auditor with a written assertion about the following, when performing either a Type I or Type II engagement, which the service auditor will then attest to:
    • The fairness of the presentation of the description of the service organization’s system;
    • The suitability of the design of the controls to achieve the related control objectives stated in the description; and
    • The operating effectiveness of those controls to achieve the related control objectives stated in the description (Type II Only)
  2. During the process of understanding the service organization’s system, the Service Auditor would be required to obtain information that would identify risks that the description of the service organization’s system is not fairly presented or that the control objectives stated in the description were not achieved due to intentional actions by service organization personnel.

SSAE 18 adds an additional set of requirements to further enhance SSAE 16 standard:

  1. Requires the inclusion of a Complementary Subservice Organization Controls section (similar to what is currently required for SOC 2).
  2. Requires the performance of a detailed Risk Assessment based on the control objectives defined in the report.

Remember: Although the reporting standard is soon to be, SSAE 18, the SSAE 16 and ISAE 3204, are all still considered to be a SOC 1 Report!

The latest changes are meant to give the end user a clearer picture of their vendor’s subservice organizations and the responsibilities of the end user as well (Complementary User Entity Controls), which, will help to provide an all around higher level of assurance and understanding to all involved.

SOC 2 and SOC 3 – Additional Reporting Options

In addition to the SOC 1 report which is restricted to controls relevant to an audit of a user entity’s financial statements, the SOC 2 and SOC 3 reports have been created to address controls relevant to operations and compliance.

  • SOC 2 Report – Trust Services Principles – The Service Organization Control (SOC) 2 Report will be performed in accordance with AT 101 and based upon the Trust Services Principles, with the ability to test and report on the design (Type I) and operating (Type II) effectiveness of a service organization’s controls (just like SOC 1 / SSAE 18)….read more
  • SOC 3 Report – WebTrust and SysTrust – The SOC 3 Report is also based upon the Trust Service Principles and performed under AT101, the difference being that a SOC 3 Report is permitted to be freely distributed (general use) and only reports on if the entity has achieved the Trust Services criteria or not (no description of tests and results or opinion on description of the system)….read more

The SSAE16 Auditing Standard

SSAE 16 is an enhancement to the current standard for Reporting on Controls at a Service Organization, the SAS70. The changes made to the standard will bring your company, and the rest of the companies in the US, up to date with new international service organization reporting standards, the ISAE 3402. The adjustments made from SAS 70 to SSAE 16 will help you and your counterparts in the US compete on an international level; allowing companies around the world to give you their business with complete confidence.

SSAE16 is now effective as of June 15, 2011, and if you have not made the necessary adjustments required, now is the time to find a quality provider to discuss the proper steps. All organizations are now required to issue their Service Auditor Reports under the SSAE 16 standards in an SOC 1 Report.

The soon to be effective, SSAE-18, is expected to follow a similar reporting structure to the SSAE-16 within a SOC 1 report.

Who Needs an SSAE 16 (SOC 1) Audit?

A service organization’s services are part of an entity’s information system if they affect any of the following:The classes of transactions in the entity’s operations that are significant to the entity’s financial statements. The procedures, both automated and manual, by which the entity’s transactions are initiated, recorded, processed, and reported from their occurrence to their inclusion in the financial statements.The related accounting records, whether electronic or manual, supporting information, and specific accounts in the entity’s financial statements involved in initiating, recording, processing and reporting the entity’s transactions. How the entity’s information system captures other events and conditions that are significant to the financial statements. The financial reporting process used to prepare the entity’s financial statements, including significant accounting estimates and disclosures.If your Company (the ‘Service Organization’) performs outsourced services that affect the financial statements of another Company (the ‘User Organization’), you will more than likely be asked to provide an SSAE16 Type II Report, especially if the User Organization is publicly traded.
Some example industries include:

  • Payroll Processing
  • Loan Servicing
  • Data Center/Co-Location/Network Monitoring Services
  • Software as a Service (SaaS)
  • Medical Claims Processors

What you Need to Know:

Before starting the SSAE 16 process, there are a number of considerations one must take into account that can save considerable time, effort, and money in the long run. Use the following items as a mini checklist for yourself:

  • Does my Company need an SSAE16, or, are we doing it just because someone asked?
  • Reports on the low end can run at least $15,000 a year, will the business lost be less of a burden than the cost of the report itself?
  • Does your company have defined Business Process and IT controls in place, or, will you need assistance developing and implementing them (readiness assessment)?
  • Have you determined the controls in place which affect the outsourced services being provided?
  • Have key stakeholders been defined and included in discussions?

There are many other issues to consider before engaging a CPA firm to help with your SSAE 16, for a more detailed ‘checklist’ – please see The SSAE 16 Checklist

You may have heard SSAE-18 is on the horizon for reports issued as of May 1, 2017. There are some important updates discussed in here: SSAE-18 – An Update to SSAE-16.

As the standard is formalized and the date approaches we will continue to provide more information to help you prepare for these changes.